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Xu Bing’s Phoenix at St. John the Divine

To see more photos from Xu Bing’s Phoenix at The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, explore the St. John the Divine location page and browse the #xubing hashtag.

For the duration of 2014, the artist Xu Bing’s Phoenix—a pair of majestic, glittering sculptures made of refuse and debris—can be viewed at The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine in New York City. “My Phoenix uses the lowliest materials of labor to adorn itself with beauty and self-respect,” Xu says.

Before coming to St. John the Divine, the work has been displayed in venues such as the Today Art Museum in Beijing and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (@massmoca). Soaring amongst the carved wood and stained glass of the cathedral, the sculptures take on a sacred quality. “It creates a unique visual and spiritual landscape for the public,” Xu says, “a landscape that I believe is capable of transporting us to an entirely new place. The splendor that underlies the phoenixes and the splendor that underlies the cathedral shine off of one another, creating a space of massive tension that moves every one of us.”

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London’s @Globemakers keep an old tradition alive

To view more photos and videos from Peter’s studio in London, explore the Bellerby Globemakers location page and follow @globemakers on Instagram.

Bellerby and Co. Globemakers (@Globemakers), a small business in a leafy borough in northeast London, is keeping the tradition of bespoke globemaking alive.

Peter Bellerby wanted to buy a globe as a present for his father’s 80th birthday, but found there were only expensive antiques or reproductions available. After two years of trying to create the perfect globe, Peter turned this newfound passion into an artisan business. Today, he is one of three known globemakers in the world and the only handmade globemaker.

Peter had to learn the process that the globemakers before him had taken to the grave. From his warehouse studio, his team handles woodworking, engraving the meridians and applying watercolored papers—with no ripples or overlaps—to the globes by hand in painstaking fashion. Small globes can take a month, and the largest can require six to eight months to complete.

"Globes, inspire people to travel, to learn about the planet, and provide geographical knowledge about how the world was at the time it was produced," says Peter’s fiancée Jade, who decided to document daily life of in the studio on Instagram. "I love Instagram as I feel you can sum up the best part of the day in one or two photos and skip all the less interesting things between."